Vitamin C

An important function of vitamin C is the role it plays in aiding the healthy growth and development of your child's bones and teeth. Consuming adequate amounts of vitamin C during the early years may help to support kids healthy bone building. It helps in the production of collagen which is the most abundant component of the extracellular bone matrix and is needed for the development of skin, muscles and bones. It is one of the most powerful antioxidants and plays a crucial role in protecting cells and tissues from oxidative damage. It acts as an antioxidant and immune supporter and helps in enhancing the absorption of iron in the body from the food your kids consume. This is especially beneficial in their rapid growth phase that requires high iron requirements. 

 

THE RIGHT DOSAGE… 

HOW MUCH VITAMIN C DOES YOUR CHILD NEED? 

The body is not able to make vitamin C on its own. It does not store vitamin C. 

Consuming adequate vitamin C is crucial for children as it plays several important roles in the body’s health and development. 

This is why Fawelo includes this important Vitamin in ‘I Can Grow’. 

During this growing period, children need balanced nutrition and vital micronutrients, especially Vitamin C in higher amounts which means that parents must ensure that their kid gets Vitamin C in adequate quantity. 

Making sure your child is getting the recommended daily dose of vitamin C is an important part of helping them achieve optimal health and development. 

The minimum recommended daily intake of Vitamin C varies for different ages: 

* Age 1 to 3 years:15 mg daily 

* Age 4 to 8 years:25 mg daily 

* Age 9 to 13 years:45 mg daily 

* Age 14 to 18 years:75 mg daily (for boys), 65 mg daily (for girls) 

 

SIGNS OF DEFICIENCY… 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 7.1% of the U.S. population can be classified as being vitamin C deficient. 

Lack of Vitamin C leads to fragile blood vessels, potentially resulting in bleeding gums and more frequent nosebleeds and bruises. It also leads to less collagen production in the skin and bones, delaying wound healing, and causing weaker bones. As the deficiency worsens, patients may experience bleeding and bruising, hair loss, painful limbs, joint discomfort, fatigue and a general lack of energy. Growth may be affected over the long term, and the child may experience more than the usual number of ordinary childhood infections.